Busy, busy….

…busy.

I think I’ll rename spring “busy- ness without end, amen”. Nice ring, huh?

We have been ramping up the outside work with the warm weather. Two of the kids I have home right now have been trying to fit in yard/ farm work in between baseball practice and college finals. DSC01959 (2)

I have been spending most of my time in the garden.

I think I’ve mentioned here that I’ve started to lean more toward growing flowers for fun and profit instead of the big food push. I still have many, many (MANY) tomato plants (and peppers, actually. And cabbage. And broccoli….) to plant in our garden space. But I think I’m going to deviate.DSC01982

Over the years of living in Montana and in my quest to make some “mad stacks, yo” (name that “Breaking” show) I’ve tried to sell any excess of what we are producing for ourselves here on the farm: rabbits, eggs, chickens (both layers and meat), milk, milk products (like yogurt), turkeys, and garden produce. Our valley is really very lucky in that we have lots of small, local farmers who specialize in bringing fresh food to the people. I can’t compete with those guys. They often have tractors and lots of land and folks to help.

I have lots of kids.

In the past, this needing of the groceries did not allow much excess for sale. No matter how hard I tried, we always ate what we produced out of the garden. All of it.

One year, we had enough piglets to sell and we made a little profit (small stacks). But that was followed by a catastrophic event that lead to losing all the babies the next year. It was awful. Willow rejected her piglets and they all died. Then she just stopped eating and we almost lost her. It was a tragic spring. I couldn’t put the kids through that again.

Who am I kidding. I couldn’t put ME through that again. I’m still not sure what happened.

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The last of the onions. #50 gone just like that!

So the mad stack quest has eluded me (yo).

Until one day last summer, I gifted a friend with a fistfull of sunflowers from the garden. She called me later to explain that she had been having a bad week and that small bunch of flowers had “made her day”.

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Peony “noses” pushing their way out of the Earth.

Hmmmm~ no one had ever told me that a bunch of green beans had “made her day”.

So this year, with some (not all) of the kids living away at school and far- slung parts of the world (one of our boys is in the Navy and because his position is precarious, we can’t talk about it here) I have a huge garden space and no children to feed, I am putting 2/3 of the garden in FLOWERS.

Not many farmers grow flowers around here . It’s hard.

We live in zone 5 (although I swear our house is really in Zone 4b) and Montana is the 8th driest state in the US so growing anything is a challenge. I was reading that locally grown flowers has been a “thing” in the rest of the US for several years. The slow flower movement is also slow to come to Montana. It is yet an unfilled niche here, I guess.

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So that’s what I’m going to do. Grow flowers.

I’m still a foodie at heart. There will be plenty of food pics and lots of food talk here on the blog. DSC01960

But I think I’ll grow me some flowers. A lot of them 🙂

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Ps~ Maisey says “hi”.

 

Today’s count: 23 eggs.

What’s for supper: soft pulled pork tacos~ yum!

Weather: Showers, with thunderstorms also possible after noon. High near 63. East northeast wind 5 to 7 mph becoming light and variable. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Tonight showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 39. South southwest wind 3 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%

 

10 thoughts

    • No worries! We’ll still have animals! Can’t do without my chickens (much to my husband’s chagrin). We’re just going to streamline the operation (IE: not as many to feed through the winter).

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  1. Many farmers grow flowers here because cut flowers are a major crop for many of them. I spent a summer with Peruvian lily production in Pescadero. If you are familiar with the paintings of Diego Rivera that depict the harvest of cut flower crops, they were done in San Mateo County, south of San Francisco.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh yes! I know Diego Rivera’s work! That’s interesting to know that he derived some of his inspiration from San Mateo Co.
      I was just reading that many of the cut flower farmers in California are leaning toward marijuana farming because the South America market has undercut the flower business there. It’s good to hear that there are still many flower farmers in California!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s so hard to lose animals! We are new to the farm life, as of about 3 years ago. We are starting our 4th spring in the country and loving it. We have lost our fav bottle-fed goat, a duck, and a bunch of chicks, oh and an alpaca to meningeal worm. UGH! My little girls are sick of animal funerals. But i think there are so many life lessons to learn and it’s in a way, very good for them.
    Hope you’re flower adventure is successful and blesses many!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh thank you! We love our animals. But without a tractor or other machinery and the kids off on their own life adventures~ well, it’s time to make some changes. And as Daniel, my youngest, says~ we’ve never had to round up a zinnia that broke through the fence to eat the neighbors garden 🙂 Thanks for ready abbEy! A new adventure awaits!!!

      Liked by 1 person

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